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J Hitchcock Tree Services Ltd.
Tree Surgery and Arboricultural Services
Definitions and Jargon



Different pruning techniques can be used to help establish and maintain a mature, healthy and aesthetically pleasing tree. We hope the following brief guide will help inform you of the options available, as well explain the jargon most often used by tree surgeons.

  • Crown Cleaning is used to remove dead, dying and diseased wood from the crown of a tree. This not only reduces the risk of dead wood falling from the tree, but also helps protect the tree from disease and the introduction of pathogens.

  • Crown Thinning is the selective pruning of branches to help reduce congestion in the crown of a tree, thereby increasing light and air movement throughout the crown. Thinning helps to reduce the weight of foliage on major tree limbs, as well as helping to retain a tree’s natural form.

  • Crown Raising selectively removes the lower limbs and branches from a tree in order to improve clearance. This could be to reduce the impact of a tree on buildings, on traffic, both vehicles and pedestrians, or to open up a view underneath a tree. 

  • Crown Reduction quite simply reduces the size of a tree. It is distinct to "topping", in that crown reduction maintains the natural form of a tree, thereby also maintaining it's integrity and aesthetic value. 
POLLARDING
  • Pollarding is used in a variety of situations to limit or radically re-shape the size and form of a tree.
  • Most pollarding is carried out in winter or early spring when trees lie dormant, although this is species dependant - always check with a reputable tree surgeon before commissioning pollarding work, as it is not always the best solution for every tree.
  • Pollarding can solve a number of problems by, for example, preventing trees outgrowing their environment, wherever and however that is defined. However, be aware that once pollarded, the tree will require to be re-pollarded on a 1-3 year cycle, depending upon the species and maturity.




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